A very merry Czech Christmas

I’m so glad you’re joining us on our journey, celebrating Christmas Around the World!

If you missed Living Life Intentionally’s introduction post, you can pop on over now (she’s got some spectacular printables to go alongside our series!).

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We will be spending Christmas in the capital city of the Czech Republic, so chose to learn more about the traditions that they have ahead of our trip.

So, firstly, Merry Christmas, or ‘Prejeme Vam Vesele Vanoce’.

Celebrations for Christmas in the Czech Republic begin with the visit of St. Nicholas on December 6th and end with the visit of the Three Kings on 6th January. In Czech Republic, St. Nicholas is called Svaty Mikalas and is believed to climb to earth down from heaven on a golden rope along with an angel and a devil who brings a whip. Svaty Mikalas asks the children if they have been good and the angel writes their answers. Naughty children could be thrown in the devil’s sack and taken to hell.

St. Nicholas is the signal for winter baking to start, and the heart shape is a popular design. So we made some very easy Heart shaped Jammy Dodgers.

Czech heart shaped biscuits

An ancient tradition shared by Czechoslovakia and Poland involves cutting a branch from a cherry tree putting it in water indoors to bloom. If it blooms before Christmas it is considered good luck, and also a sign that the winter won’t be too long. It’s the perfect cue for a craft like this easy bubble print blossom tree from Red Ted Art.

Christmas is a quiet and peaceful religious time. The main celebrations are on Christmas Eve. Some people fast during Christmas Eve in the hope that they will see a vision of ‘the golden pig’ appear on the wall before dinner which is meant to be a sign of good luck! The celebratory dish is Carp, usually fried.

The famous King Wenceslas of the Christmas Carol came from the Czech Republic. His goodness and his beliefs in Christianity infuriated his mother, and his brother murdered him on the Church steps yet before he died he asked for God’s mercy for his brother’s evil act. He became the patron saint of Bohemia. There is a large square in the centre of Prague called Wencelas Square which is a World Heritage Site and hosts a Christmas Market every year. We’re very excited that we will get to enjoy it ourselves in under two weeks.

Living Life Intentionally has a wonderful ebook which features lots of facts and craft ideas for each of the countries visited. It’s free to download and you can download it here.

christmas around the world

With thanks to Mirka at All Baby Advice for her insider tips on all things Czech.

8 comments to A very merry Czech Christmas

  • Iva Wolfhill

    With all the respect to you, I need to say, coming from former Czechoslovakia- I never heard about golden rope or talk about taking children to hell, neither , of a vision of a golden pig. People fast, from spiritual reasons. Spelling of Mikulas is the correct one,, with u, not a. I know, you work hard on this and it is not your fault , what others tell you, Also people are more concerned about Christ, they are not spending fortunes for gifts as here, and despite baking lots, they do not have tendency to overeat and throw food in the garbage. Gifts are just a small part of festivities and also people are not stressed, as here, because they do not host million parties to look like Martha S. They also do not go to debt and have still, good cheer, peace and fun. They do not feel burned out- because they have more discipline and don’t overdo things. It is really worth pondering, how people in America need always more and are never satisfied, I wish people could settle for less and help those, that really need the basics and can’t help themselves. That is the true Christmas spirit. Everybody benefits that way- because overindulging is unhealthy and disgusting, while others are starving in my town. Having more stuff ,that I have no use or space for is sick too, when many can’t afford new clothes, or pots, furniture. People do it backwards- feeding the overstuffed and starving the hungry . THAT IS THE BIGGEST DIFFERENCE; people in my country are not so greedy, they are not so indifferent and did not loose the sense of wright and wrong.
    Anyhow, thanks for all the good work, God bless you . Have a meaningful Christmas!

  • Shame I have only just seen this, but a fab post, and thanks for mentioning me too xxx

  • I thought Zwarte Peit in the Netherlands was harsh, I am glad I read this. My, goodness! Thank you for an enlightening post.

  • Very interesting! And those cookies look amazingly gorgeous & delicious!! Thanks for joining us on Christmas Around the World =-)

    Beth
    P.S. I linked up your post for you =-)

  • Oh my those look anything but easy but very delicious!

Go on! You know you want to tell me what you think!